The Mental Elf

This page shows the latest items from the The Mental Elf newsfeed.

Improving outcomes for people with first episode psychosis

Elwira Lubos summarises a recent review of reviews looking at the evidence for improving outcomes in first-episode psychosis.

The post Improving outcomes for people with first episode psychosis appeared first on National Elf Service.

19 April 2018, 5:00 am

Moderate and heavy alcohol consumption: what impact on later life brain and cognition?

Sally Adams summarises a recent clinical review in Evidence Based Mental Health on the effects of drinking alcohol on late-life brain and cognition.

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The post Moderate and heavy alcohol consumption: what impact on later life brain and cognition? appeared first on National Elf Service.

18 April 2018, 5:00 am

This is your brain on social media

Anne-Laura van Harmelen and Susanne Schweizer publish their debut elf blog on a recent narrative review of social media use and brain development during adolescence published in Nature Communications.

The post This is your brain on social media appeared first on National Elf Service.

17 April 2018, 5:00 am

Gender identity in young people: determinants, epidemiology, mental health and management

Dean Connolly considers a recent review of research into gender identity in young people, which focuses particularly on treatment paradigms and controversies.

The post Gender identity in young people: determinants, epidemiology, mental health and management appeared first on National Elf Service.

11 April 2018, 5:00 am

Alcohol is the number one modifiable risk factor for dementia

Marie Crabbe looks at a recent retrospective cohort study in The Lancet Public Health which explores the contribution of alcohol use disorders to the burden of dementia in France.

The post Alcohol is the number one modifiable risk factor for dementia appeared first on National Elf Service.

9 April 2018, 5:00 am

Adolescent friendships predict later resilient functioning

Simon Brett looks at a recent study in Psychological Medicine which suggests that adolescent friendships predict later resilient functioning across psychosocial domains in a healthy community cohort, whereas family support does not predict later resilience.

The post Adolescent friendships predict later resilient functioning appeared first on National Elf Service.

6 April 2018, 5:00 am

A hierarchy of stigma based on mental health diagnosis?

Laura Hemming explores a recent qualitative study of the experiences of stigma felt by people with mental health problems who were recruited through a local mental health charity.

The post A hierarchy of stigma based on mental health diagnosis? appeared first on National Elf Service.

5 April 2018, 5:00 am

Mindfulness may help university students reduce stress

Judith Shipman summarises the Mindful Student Study; a pragmatic RCT of a mindfulness-based intervention to increase resilience to stress in university students.

The post Mindfulness may help university students reduce stress appeared first on National Elf Service.

30 March 2018, 5:00 am

Does co-locating welfare advice services improve mental health?

Katie Evans from Money and Mental Health considers a recent study looking at the impact of co-located welfare advice in healthcare settings, which found significant improvements in financial outcomes, but less convincing results in terms of health benefits.

The post Does co-locating welfare advice services improve mental health? appeared first on National Elf Service.

23 March 2018, 6:00 am

Smartphone apps for depression: do they work?

Michelle Eskinazi and Clara Belessiotis write their debut elf blog on a recent meta-analysis of smartphone‐based mental health interventions for depression, which concludes that there is a possibly promising role for apps in the prevention and treatment of sub-clinical, mild and moderate depressive symptoms.

The post Smartphone apps for depression: do they work? appeared first on National Elf Service.

22 March 2018, 6:00 am