Reasonably Adjusted? Mental health services and support for people with autism and people with learning disabilities

Reasonably Adjusted?This report authored by the National Development Team for Inclusion (NDTi) shows how to clarify and embed into practice reasonable adjustments for people with autism and people with learning disabilities in mainstream mental health services.

The report includes a number of practical examples, ideas and recommendations for making mental health services more accessible.

Download Reasonably Adjusted? Mental health services and support for people with autism and people with learning disabilities

Key points

  • Make sure that people with learning disabilities or autism and mental health problems get good advocacy support.
  • Identify people with autism or learning disabilities and mental health problems in health records so that reasonable adjustments can be made
  • Health checks are an important way for people with learning disabilities to get their mental health needs checked out
  • Health action plans can help health staff know what reasonable adjustments people need
  • Make psychological therapies accessible to people with learning disabilities and people with autism.
  • Provide information about health services in easy read and accessible formats.
  • Ensure person centred assessment and planning for in-patient services
  • Ensure that reasonable adjustments are written into policies

To support the report the NDTi developed a good practice database at https://www.improvinghealthandlives.org.uk/mhra/, where you can find and upload policy documents, accessible information leaflets, training programmes and other innovations.

See also

Equally accessible? Making mental health services more accessible for learning disabled or autistic people Equally accessible? Making mental health services more accessible for learning disabled or autistic people

This briefing published by the NHS Confederation highlights innovations to improve access to mental health services for people with learning disabilities or autism. Read more »